A Farewell to Harm

Political Corruption No Longer “Normal”




Millions of ordinary citizens in countries around the world are unhappy with corruption and want their governments to stop it, reports a recent survey by Transparency International, a Berlin-based group that tracks global corruption. As a result, more governments are setting up anticorruption programs. Nearly 150 countries have signed (80 have ratified) the new United Nations Convention Against Corruption, which came into force a year ago.

The treaty is the only global effort to bring corruption under control and makes prevention a priority. It requires signatories to criminalize basic acts such as bribery, embezzlement and money laundering. They also must work to make public procurement transparent and institute codes of conduct for police and other civil servants.

Recently, members of the Convention met for the first time since the treaty took effect to establish a system to monitor each country’s compliance. They also agreed to work out a global strategy for assisting in the return of stolen assets. Citizens no longer are willing to pay the social, mental and monetary cost of $1 trillion a year for something neither they nor their governments want–payouts in bribes for police, services, and business contracts.


Source: The Christian Science Monitor

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Renewable Payoff

For a few hours last May, Germany’s renewable mix of energy generated so much power that customers were actually paid for using electricity.

Sealife Sanctuary

Greenpeace is working with the European Union and Germany to set aside an Antarctic sanctuary of almost three-quarters of a million square miles to protect whales, penguins and other wildlife.

Bureaucratic Bungle

The agriculture giant’s newest weed-killer, dicamba, is facing opposition from farmers that report crop damage and human health issues.

Plumbing Progress

An innovative Australian project recycles discarded ocean plastic into 3-D printer filament, which is then used to make replacement plumbing parts in needy areas of the world.

Urban Trees

Tree cover works to reduce depression, improve productivity and lessen disease, yet four million city trees a year are being lost due to their low priority in municipal budgets.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags