Hospice Care Adds Months for Cancer Patients

End-of-Life Care Extends Survival Time




Researchers from Houston’s MD Anderson Cancer Center determined that hospice care significantly increases survival rates among patients with metastatic (stage IV) melanoma, a difficult-to-treat form of cancer that occurs when melanoma cells have spread through the lymph nodes to other parts of the body.

The study’s authors followed 862 metastatic melanoma cancer patients. Of these, 523 patients received one to three days of hospice care, 114 patients received four or more days and 225 people received no hospice care through their survival period. Those that received four or more days had an average survival period, which typically dates from the original diagnosis, of 10.2 months, while those that received none averaged 6.1 months. In addition, the end-of-life hospital costs for those receiving the most hospice visits were nearly half of what was incurred by patients not receiving hospice attention.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Gut Bacteria Imbalance Linked to Chronic Fatigue

In a Columbia University study, people with chronic fatigue syndrome were found to have an imbalance in the levels of certain gut bacteria.

Pink Noise While Asleep Helps Memory

Random sound with more bass than white noise—known as pink noise—improved sleep brainwave patterns linked to memory retention in older adults.

Alcohol Affects Our Heartbeat

In a study during German Oktoberfest, arrhythmia showed up in the heart rhythms of 30 percent of drinkers, compared to 4 percent of the general population.

Dear Diary Comforts the Elderly

Elderly volunteers that kept reflective journals on the dying process were better able to be companions for those in their final days.

Long-Term Cell Phone Use a Health Risk

Swedish scientists have found an increased risk of glioma, a type of brain cancer, in cell phone users, with risks rising with the years and with frequency of use.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags