Green Envy

Don’t Be So Quick to Bash the Rich




A survey at social research site Queendom.com reveals that stereotypes of the richest class of society as being uniformly selfish individuals are not entirely accurate. It seems that having money does not necessarily mean that a person has an overactive ego. Actor Will Smith, with an estimated net worth of $200 million, observes, “Money and success don’t change people; they merely amplify what is already there.”

Queendom data shows a difference of only a few percentage points between respondents of varying income levels in matters of altruism such as doing and returning favors, putting themselves in others’ shoes, sympathy and empathy. The area where those in a higher socioeconomic status rank at the top is in charitable contributions.

Ilona Jerabek, president of parent company PsychTests AIM, says, “Our personality impacts every aspect of our life—the choices we make, the people we surround ourselves with, the career we pursue, the way we respond to life experiences, the way we manage our finances and whether or not we share our good fortune.”


Take the survey at Tinyurl.com/AltruismTest.

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