Bye-Bye Birdie

230 Avian Species on the National Watch List




Scientists from 23 organizations, including the federal government, universities and conservation groups, have spent years on the State of the Birds Study, looking at 230 species of birds from different habitats compiling its watch list. Peter Marra, a migratory bird specialist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Zoo, in Washington, D.C., attributes the population drops of the birds in the most trouble to disappearing habitat or reduced range.

Some coastal birds are doing better, and previously endangered wetland birds are recovering due to laws that are protecting them. Marra says, “These populations come back when we create the habitat. The report emphasizes that it’s better to focus on birds that aren’t yet in decline and keep them that way.”

Ken Rosenberg, a bird biologist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, in Ithaca, New York, and an author of the report, says that hunters, as well as conservationists, deserve credit for preserving ducks. He acknowledges, “We’ve put a tremendous amount of resources and money into wetland and waterfowl conservation because of the hunters that contribute financially.”

But lots of songbirds are in trouble, and Florida, where bird habitat is disappearing fast, is a crucial stopover for migrating birds. It’s the kind of place that birds both common and endangered urgently need to survive.


Source: National Public Radio

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Lower Overhead

Cincinnati has purchased 100 percent renewable energy to operate most of its municipal buildings through at least 2021, cutting its utility rates by more than $100,000 annually.

Independent Action

More than 50 mayors from around the globe have signed the Chicago Climate Charter, intended to guide cities toward reaching greenhouse gas emissions reductions similar to those targeted in the Paris climate accord.

Deadly Cargo

The Iranian tanker Sanchi oil spill in the East China Sea has scientists worried about unknown impacts caused by the toxic nature of the ultra-light, highly flammable oil.

Eco-Villains

A beach cleanup in the Philippines resulted in the finding that Nestlé, Unilever and the Indonesian company PT Torabika Mayora were the top sources of plastic waste there.

Green Team

The Seattle Mariners’ Safeco Field recycles 96 percent of all waste, garnering the team Major League Baseball’s Green Glove Award for 2017.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags