Harvesting Fog

Simple Device Provides Safe Water in Africa




photo: ArchitectureAndVision.com

The WarkaWater tower is providing an innovative new way to harvest safe drinking water, normally an onerous task in Ethiopia and many other parts of Africa. Obtaining water via repeated trips to the nearest source is extremely time-consuming and what’s collected is often highly contaminated and harmful to drink. Also, this task is commonly carried out by females, putting them in danger of sexual harassment or worse enroute.

The towers, inspired by the native warka tree, are a vertical bamboo system that harvests potable, clean water from the air through condensation, using a fog-harvesting fabric that can collect up to 25 gallons of safe drinking water per day. Each tower costs about $550, and can be built in a few days by village residents using locally available materials.


Source: Inhabitat.com

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