Green Schools

Earth Day Social Network Launches




Earth Day Network (EDN) has launched the first interactive social network for K-12 educators and students, the Educators’ Network, (edu.EarthDay.org), which is intended to fill the growing need for high quality educational tools that support environmental literacy and share “green” school resources. The network will empower teachers and students with the knowledge and skills necessary to make their communities healthier and more sustainable, thanks to a $250,000 grant from Wells Fargo & Company.

EDN’s Educators’ Network enables educators to share a library of materials collected from teachers nationwide, including lesson plans, teaching materials, grants and blogs. Network members can also “Ask the Expert” for advice, engage in dialogue with EDN staff and key partners, and find grant opportunities targeted to educators.

The network also provides resources and tools to support schools in winning the Green Ribbon Schools Award, recently announced by the U.S. Department of Education, rewarding schools that demonstrate significant progress toward increasing their sustainability literacy, reducing their school’s environmental footprint and improving the overall health of students and staff.

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