Supplements Could Save $70 Billion in Medical Costs

Alternative Healthcare Management




In a Frost & Sullivan study report authored by Christopher Shanahan and Robert de Lorimier, Ph.D., the use of dietary supplements, including B vitamins, phytosterols and dietary fiber, could reduce the cost of treating coronary artery disease in the U.S. by nearly $50 billion over the next seven years. In addition, healthcare costs related to diabetes, vision problems and osteoporosis could be reduced by nearly $20 billion collectively with the use of certain supplements.

The projections were based on cost-benefit analysis comparing a series of scenarios to assess the effect on overall disease management costs if an identified high-risk population were to avoid costly medical events by increasing their intake of dietary supplements purchased out-of-pocket versus no supplement usage.

“The healthcare system spends a tremendous amount of money treating chronic disease, but has failed to focus on ways to reduce those costs through prevention,” says Steve Mister, president of the Council for Responsible Nutrition Foundation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only 3 percent of U.S. healthcare costs are spent on the prevention of chronic diseases.

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