Food Charter

United Nations Blueprints Sustainability Goals




A new publication, Trade and Environment Review: Wake Up Before it is Too Late, from the United Nations Commission on Trade and Development, declares that transformative changes are needed in current food, agriculture and trade systems to increase diversity on farms, reduce use of fertilizer and other inputs, support small-scale farmers and create strong local food systems.

Key indicators of needed transformation in agriculture include increased soil carbon content and better integration between crop and livestock production; more incorporation of agroforestry and wild vegetation; reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of livestock production; reduction of GHG through sustainable peatland, forest and grassland management; optimization of organic and inorganic fertilizer use; reduction of waste throughout the food chains; changing dietary patterns toward climate-friendly food consumption; and reform of the international trade regime for food and agriculture.

The report includes contributions from more than 60 international experts, including a commentary from the Institute of Agriculture and Trade Policy.


Source: iatp.org

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