Online Literacy

Students Learning to Adopt Internet Academics




The findings of a survey of teachers conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, in collaboration with the College Board and the National Writing Project, show that the Internet has opened up a vast world of information for today’s students, but digital literacy skills need improvement.

Three-quarters of Advanced Placement and National Writing Project teachers say that the Internet and digital search tools have had a “mostly positive” impact on their students’ research habits, but 87 percent say these technologies are creating an easily distracted generation with short attention spans, and 64 percent say they do more to divert students’ attention than to help them academically.

The good news is that 99 percent of teachers in the study agree with the notion that, “The Internet enables students to access a wider range of resources than would otherwise be available,” and 65 percent agree that, “It makes today’s students more selfsufficient researchers.”


Read the full report at Tinyurl.com/TeenResearch.

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