A Diet for Healthy Bones

A Reason to Go Mediterranean




Age-related bone mass loss and decreased bone strength affect both genders. Now, the first randomized study, published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, indicates that consuming a Mediterranean diet enriched with olive oil may be associated with increased serum levels of osteocalcin, a protein that plays a vital role in bone formation. Earlier studies have shown that the incidence of osteoporosis in Europe is lower in the Mediterranean basin, possibly due to the traditional Mediterranean diet, which is rich in fruits, vegetables, olives and olive oil.

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