A Diet for Healthy Bones

A Reason to Go Mediterranean




Age-related bone mass loss and decreased bone strength affect both genders. Now, the first randomized study, published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, indicates that consuming a Mediterranean diet enriched with olive oil may be associated with increased serum levels of osteocalcin, a protein that plays a vital role in bone formation. Earlier studies have shown that the incidence of osteoporosis in Europe is lower in the Mediterranean basin, possibly due to the traditional Mediterranean diet, which is rich in fruits, vegetables, olives and olive oil.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Selenium and CoQ10 Provide Lasting Benefits

Twelve years after a study ended, senior participants that had taken CoQ10 and selenium had lowered their cardiovascular mortality risk more than 40 percent.

Herbs Make Worthy Prebiotics

Ginger, black pepper and holy basil showed significant prebiotic activity compared to the well- known prebiotic fructooligosaccharide (FOS).

Eating Mediterranean Diet Helps Save Eyesight

A study of 4,500 French and Dutch adults found that those that ate a Mediterranean diet lowered their risk of late-stage, age-related macular degeneration by 41 percent.

Calorie Restriction Slows Aging

Adults on a reduced-calorie diet for two years evidenced the reduced oxidative stress that protects against Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, cancer and diabetes.

Take Magnesium to Metabolize Vitamin D

Without adequate amounts of magnesium in the body, vitamin D supplements can’t be metabolized; high amounts may even increase the risk of vascular calcification.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags