Unplug During Screen-Free Week

Turn to Healthier Activities




The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends zero screen time for children under 2 and less than two hours per day for older children. Yet, the Kaiser Family Foundation reports that 40 percent of 3-month-old infants are regular viewers of television and DVDs, and school-age kids spend nearly twice as many hours with screen media such as television, video games, computers and handheld devices as they spend attending school. To help kids, families, schools and communities turn off screens and turn on healthier activities, the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC) urges everyone to participate in Screen-Free Week, April 30 through May 6.

CCFC is a national coalition of health care professionals, educators, advocacy groups, parents and individuals, with a mission to reclaim childhood from corporate marketers. “The commercialization of childhood is the link between many of the most serious problems facing children and society today,” advises CCFC Director Susan Linn. “Childhood obesity, eating disorders, youth violence, sexualization, family stress, underage alcohol and tobacco use, rampant materialism and the erosion of children’s creative play are all exacerbated by advertising and marketing.”

Learn more about the weeklong event, efforts to restrict marketers’ access to children and how to help, at CommercialFreeChildhood.org.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Negative Stereotypes Sabotage Girl Soccer Players

Teenage girls performed worst in a soccer ball-dribbling drill after reading an article about the perceived incompetence of female soccer players.

Sedentary Kids Lag in Reading Skills

Young Finnish children that tend to be sedentary showed lower reading scores than peers that are generally physically active.

Kids Going Online at Bedtime Sleep Poorly

British kids between 6 and 19 that used devices within 90 minutes of falling asleep were more likely to sleep badly and be sleepy during the day, which also can lead to poor diet choices.

Early-to-Bed Kids at Less Risk of Obesity

Young children that were tucked into bed before 8 p.m., when examined 10 years later, had less than half the obesity rate of those that had gone to bed after 9 p.m.

Teens Hooked on Ear Buds Prone to Tinnitus

Half of a group of 170 teenagers that used ear buds reported bouts of ringing or buzzing in their ears.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags