Sweet Stuff Combats Infections

The Healing Power of Honey




Honey’s use as a medicine was described on Sumerian clay tablets dating back 4,000 years, and ancient Egyptians made ointments of the sticky substance to treat wounds. Now, contemporary scientists have shown that manuka honey, which comes from New Zealand, could be an efficient way to clear chronically infected wounds and help reverse bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

Professor Rose Cooper, of the University of Wales Institute, Cardiff, in the UK, has investigated how manuka honey interacts with bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Group A Streptococcus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). She discovered that the honey interfered with their growth, blocking the formation of biofilms that can wall off such bacteria from antibiotic remedies.

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