Diabetes Linked to Dirty Air

There is More to Your Risk than Food




Health wise, the air we breathe is just as important as the foods we eat, according to a recent report published in the journal Diabetes Care. The report is based on one of the first largescale, population-based studies linking diabetes prevalence with air pollution. According to researchers from Children’s Hospital Boston, a strong, consistent correlation exists between adult diabetes and particulate air pollution, an association that persists after adjustment for other risk factors such as obesity and ethnicity. The relationship was seen even at exposure levels below the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency safety limit.

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