Aloe Vera Gel for Teeth

Move Over Toothpaste




Aloe vera gel can soothe burned skin, take the itch out of bug bites and help treat rashes from poisonous plants. It also appears to be good for our teeth. A recent study published in the peer-reviewed journal General Dentistry found that aloe vera gel worked as well as regular toothpaste to clean teeth and eliminate cavity-causing bacteria.

Moreover, the study showed that the gel isn’t as hard on the teeth as abrasive toothpastes and so may be better for folks with sensitive teeth or gums. However, warns Dilip George, a master of dental surgery and co-author of the study, to be effective, products must contain the stabilized gel from the center of the plant and adhere to gentle manufacturing standards. To find a good aloe vera tooth gel, the researchers suggested checking with the International Aloe Science Council (iasc.org) to review the products that have received its seal of quality.

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