Natural Help for Alzheimer’s

Common Recommendations to Help Slow the Progression




Natural health experts have known for some time that lifestyle changes and nutritional supplements can slow the progression of age-related dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Following are the most common recommendations, excerpted from www.DrWeil.com:

 • Institute a program of daily exercise to improve circulation and help keep the brain oxygenated.
 • Get adequate mental exercise through reading and socializing.
 • Consume a diet rich in antioxidants, with an emphasis on whole grains, fruits, fish, vegetables, nuts and seeds.
 • Consider taking a daily low dose of aspirin. Some studies have found that aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.
 • Supplement with vitamins C and E.
 • Use a daily multivitamin that provides folic acid and other B vitamins.
 • Give American or Asian ginseng a try. Preliminary studies indicate that ginsenosides (the active ingredients in ginseng) may slow the progression of Alzheimer’s and improve memory and behavior.

Before taking any supplements or over-the-counter drugs, it’s essential to consult a physician to determine the proper supplements and safe dosage for optimum effectiveness.

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