U.S. Kids Not Drinking Enough Liquids

Children in America are Dehydrated




A 2015 study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control has found that more than half of American children are dehydrated. The research analyzed data from the 2009-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for children 6 to 19 years old. The study also found that boys have a 76 percent greater likelihood of being dehydrated, and African-Americans were 34 percent more likely to not drink enough water compared with U.S. Caucasians.

“Dehydration accounts for hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations each year due to a number of illnesses that can lead to depletion of fluids and electrolytes from the body,” says Dr. Daniel Rauch, associate professor of pediatrics at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, in New York City.

It can be difficult for parents to gauge the level of hydration in children. Researchers from the University of Arkansas have determined that urine color provides a reliable indicator of hydration levels, with darker urine indicating increasing levels of dehydration.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

City Homesteading

Across the country, people in communities of all sizes are crafting ways to grow food, build eco-homes and live in harmony with the environment and each other.

Big Breakfast, Lower Body Mass

People that make breakfast their largest meal of the day have lower body mass, while those that make dinner the biggest meal are likely to weigh more, a recent study concluded.

Zinc Inhibits Throat Cancer

University of Texas researchers have found that zinc supplements can inhibit or slow the growth of esophageal cancer cells.

Moderate Exercise Guards Against Depression

A mere one hour of exercise a week reduced depression in 12 percent of Norwegian study participants.

Antidepressants in Pregnancy Linked to Autism

Children born to Swedish mothers that took antidepressants when pregnant had a slightly higher risk of autism compared to mothers with psychiatric conditions not taking the meds.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags