Parents Use Complementary Health Care for Kids

Children Taking Part in Alternative Medicine or Practices




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The 2012 National Health Interview Survey, published in 2015, included a survey on the use of complementary medicine practices. Nearly 45,000 Americans were questioned, including more than 10,000 children between the ages of 4 and 17.

The survey found that nearly 12 percent of children had used complementary medicine, either in a practice or product, during the year studied. The most common form of alternative medicine among children was natural supplements, such as fish oil, probiotics and melatonin. Chiropractic care and yoga were also popular choices.

Researchers found that parents sought complementary approaches most often for children due to back or neck pain, musculoskeletal conditions, colds, anxiety, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or insomnia.


This article appears in the January 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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