Energy Drinks Harm the Heart

Produces Abnormalities and Raises Blood Pressure




In addition to alertness, energy drinks may also trigger abnormal heart rhythms and increased blood pressure. Researchers from the School of Pharmacy at the University of the Pacific, in Stockton, California, tested 27 healthy adults. The volunteers were split into three groups—one drank two cans of an energy drink per day, another consumed the same amount of a drink with Panax ginseng and the third a similar-tasting placebo beverage.

The subjects were given cardiovascular testing before and after the trial. After three weeks, the group imbibing the energy drinks had a significant increase in abnormal heart rhythms and higher blood pressure. The ginseng and placebo groups saw no change in their heart conditions.

Sachin A. Shah, a doctor of pharmacy and professor at Pacific’s School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, says, “Our findings suggest that certain energy drinks may increase the risk of having an abnormal heart rhythm when consumed in high volumes. While we wait for more data, some consumers should exercise caution and not blindly follow the buzz.”

The Center for Science in Public Interest, a consumer health advocacy group, has reported that as of June 2014, 34 deaths have been associated with energy drinks.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Awake Parenting

Children are not ours to possess or own, but rather to guide into living fearlessly and authentically.

Pets Love Music

With their ears attuned to different frequencies, horses neigh to Bach, cats groove to New Age, and dogs de-stress to “Greensleeves.”

Championing Holistic Athletes

Athletes in a wide range of sports are finding that natural diets and holistic healing modalities help them achieve their personal best.

Milk Chocolate Also Benefits Heart Health

Harvard researchers found that people eating one to 12 ounces a month of milk chocolate – but less than 30 ounces – had a lower risk of irregular heartbeat.

Gut Bacteria Imbalance Linked to Chronic Fatigue

In a Columbia University study, people with chronic fatigue syndrome were found to have an imbalance in the levels of certain gut bacteria.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags