Vermont’s Victory

Court Rules GMO Labeling Constitutional




In April, a federal court denied a request by powerful food industry groups to block Vermont’s landmark law requiring the labeling of genetically modified foods (GMO).The plaintiffs, including the Grocery Manufacturers Association, had sought a preliminary injunction to stop implementation of Act 120, which passed in May 2014 and will take effect a year from now.

U.S. District Court Judge Christina Reiss’ ruling said that the plaintiffs failed to show that they would suffer “irreparable harm” to warrant an injunction, and that the state had established that the act’s GMO disclosure requirement is constitutional.

“This important ruling affirms the constitutionality of genetically engineered food labeling, as well as the rights of Vermonters and U.S. citizens across the country,” states George Kimbrell, senior attorney for the Center for Food Safety and counsel in the case.

The ruling came shortly after an analysis by the Environmental Working Group found that industry groups spent $63.6 million last year—triple the amount spent in 2013—to defeat GMO-labeling measures. The general consensus is the Vermont case is likely to go to trial.

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