Food Finder

Software Tracks Farm to Fork Supply Chain




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Serious concerns have surfaced about food transparency, and people are asking questions. Documentaries like Rotten urge consumers to think twice about the origins and ingredients of their food, but answers are not always readily available.

In addition to environmental concerns like long-distance transportation, people are worried about food recalls and safety. FoodLogiQ’s software solution creates “farm to fork traceability”, welcoming companies across the industry to participate, with approximately 7,000 having registered so far in some 100 countries—including Whole Foods, Chipotle Mexican Grill, Carl’s Jr., Subway, Buffalo Wild Wings and the Panda Restaurant Group.

Information provides useful details such as where the food was harvested, whether pesticides were used, where the food traveled and how it was processed. FoodLogiQ Chief Marketing Officer Katy Jones suggests this is an important moment of change in the food industry, saying, “Food companies are embracing global standards to increase efficiencies and build a foundation for traceability and supply chain visibility.”


This article appears in the October 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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