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Conventional Grocery Chains Go Organic




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The Kroger grocery chain, with nearly 2,500 U.S. stores, including subsidiaries Ralphs, Fry’s, King Soopers and Food 4 Less, has decided to go all in on the organic food market as a follow-up to the 2012 release of its Simple Truth brand of organic foods. Kroger President Michael Ellis says, “We’re really just answering the customer’s call for more and better,” giving Whole Foods Market more competition.

Walmart has also begun to satisfy the growing health concerns of its shoppers by integrating organic options in its supermarkets. Now the challenge is for organic farming—which intentionally works to minimize agricultural impacts on the health of people and the planet—to meet the greater demand nationwide for healthier foods. Although implementation will vary depending on climate, experts advise that it begins with farms adopting healthy soil practices. It’s up to consumers to keep the momentum going.


Source: Healthy-Holistic-Living.com


This article appears in the November 2016 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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