Lying Labels

New Term Disguises High-Fructose Corn Syrup




The Corn Refiners Association (CRA) has resorted to creating a new label for high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) by calling it “fructose syrup” or just “fructose” because numerous scientific studies have linked it to obesity, Type 2 diabetes and autism.

HFCS is a highly processed chemical sweetener used in many processed foods, including breads, cookies, candy, condiments and soft drinks. It extends the shelf life of products and is often cheaper than sugar, the primary reasons manufacturers use it.

Standard HFCS contains from 42 to 55 percent fructose. The new term is being used when foods contain HFCS-90, which has “just” 90 percent fructose. Identifying HFCS-90 as an ingredient bizarrely gives food makers a green light to use statements such as “Contains no high-fructose corn syrup” or “No HFCS” on the product label, thus misleading buyers.

Bart Hoebel, a psychology professor at Princeton University, reports, “When rats are drinking high-fructose corn syrup at levels well below those in soda pop, they’re becoming obese; every single one, across the board. Even when rats are fed a high-fat diet, you don’t see this; they don’t all gain extra weight.”


Source: NaturalNews.com

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