Good Reads

Fiction Readers Have More Empathy




The love of books may begin at any age, but for most, it starts in childhood. Now, scientists are studying the effects of reading on the brain with MRIs, polls, surveys and experiments. The results indicate that readers of fiction are more empathetic toward others. By engaging with a story, they are temporarily placing themselves in a character’s shoes, thus fostering empathy in real life, and literary reading amplifies this effect.

According to a Stanford University study, reading a challenging book also helps us become smarter, as well as more empathetic. By attempting to tackle harder books, we create new connections in our minds that we might not have done otherwise. Neuroscientist Bob Dougherty remarks, “The right patterns of ink on a page can create vivid mental imagery and instill powerful emotions.”

David Comer Kidd, author of another related study, observes, “Like opening a window to let fresh air into our home, literature opens up our minds to the myriad ideas that we wouldn’t be able to experience on our own. We can pause to analyze the experiences depicted as if they were our own, expanding our experience of the world.”

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Creating Community

With simple, clear steps and procedures, we can build bonds with our neighbors to create a better tomorrow together.

Soul Shine

Spiritual teacher Marianne Williamson points out that it is our light, not darkness, that most frightens us.

Feline Workforce

Cats now star in tasks ranging from boosting office morale to providing private security.

Transformative Travel

When we set our intention, open up to the unexpected and chat with locals, travel offers us life-changing gifts.

Resveratrol May Help Eye Health

Chinese researchers have determined that oral resveratrol passes through the brain to the eyes, where it may prevent vision degeneration.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags