Fresh Catch

Community Supported Fisheries Share Bounty of the Sea




Community supported agriculture is a growing movement in which subscribers pay farmers for weekly shares of their crops before the growing season starts, benefiting both. The farmers receive an infusion of cash up front and are paid a fair price for the food they produce. Consumers receive fresh food from sustainable, local farms and are often introduced to vegetables and fruits they might not try otherwise.

The same concept applies to new community supported fisheries (CSF), which reconnect coastal communities to their local food systems. According to Paul Greenberg, author of American Catch: The Fight for our Local Seafood, 91 percent of the seafood that Americans eat comes from other countries, while one-third of the seafood caught by American fishermen is sold outside our borders. He believes this situation exists because most Americans aren’t willing to pay premium prices for better seafood and domestic fishermen realize better prices overseas.

By using the website LocalCatch.org/locator to find nearby CSF programs, pioneering coastal communities can benefit from both supporting sustainable fishing practices and their local environment while still sufficiently feeding their residents.


Source: Mother Nature Network

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