Eco IKEA

Designing Cabinets and Chairs Made from Recyclables




BestPhotoPlus/Shutterstock.com

Swedish design firm and retailer IKEA is introducing a new line of “no waste” products that includes seating, vases and kitchen cabinets made of recycled materials. IKEA hopes that the design will help people see waste not as garbage, but as just another material that can be used in creating new and beautiful things.

The Kungsbacka kitchen employs affordable, sustainable supplies that look stylish, including cabinet doors incorporating recycled plastic bottles and recycled wood; the entire cabinet is said to be 99.9 percent recycled.

The Odger chair is 70 percent recycled plastic and 30 percent renewable wood. The design, available in a range of colors and wood finishes, is the result of collaboration between Swedish designers at Form Us With Love and eschews the environment-harming plastics of other chairs.

IKEA also melts recycled glass to turn it into beautiful vases. Each mouth-blown vase is unique, thanks to the materials.


This article appears in the May 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Dogs Need Detoxing Too

Steps such as altering a dog’s diet and adding key supplements will restore mental and physical energies, restore the shine in their eyes and the luster in their coat.

Maria Rodale Helps Organic Farmers Succeed

To spur consumer demand and help farmers, the Rodale Institute performs top-quality research on the benefits of eating organic foods and optimal farming methods.

An Awesome Antidote to Polarization

In these black-versus-white days of civic discord, awe opens us up to fresh views and the value of respectful, harmonious living.

Coal Phase-Out Boosts Health

Both premature deaths and hospital admissions caused by air pollution have dropped sharply since Ontario systematically closed down its coal-fired power plants.

Unique Inflamed Gut Linked to Type 1 Diabetes

Italian researchers have found gut inflammation in Type 1 diabetics linked to 10 specific genes, raising hopes for treatment.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags