Bottle Buyback

Britain May Charge Deposit to Reduce Bottle Litter




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Britain only recycled 57 percent of the plastic bottles that were sold there in 2016, and is considering charging a deposit fee to reduce litter. Scotland is also introducing a deposit return policy for cans and bottles. Denmark recycles 90 percent and South Australia 80 percent by using deposits as an incentive.

UK Environment Secretary Michael Gove says that almost 8 million tons of plastic are dumped into the world’s oceans each year, with up to 80 percent washing out to sea from land. Gove is consulting with the industry to determine the advantages and disadvantages of different types of reward and return systems for plastic, metal and glass drinks containers. Britain’s decision to charge a deposit for each plastic bag in 2015 has slashed usage.


This article appears in the February 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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