Global Briefs Archive

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Milk Muddle

A huge Colorado feedlot that supplies organic milk to Walmart and Costco has come under scrutiny after satellite imagery raised questions about whether it complies with outdoor grazing rules.

Plutonium Problem

To safely dispose of 56 million gallons of nuclear waste dating back to the Second World War, the Department of Energy might replace a glass-log encasement plan with a cement option.

Experiential Ed

Schools in Finland and New Orleans are pioneering new ways to involve students in a more collaborative education model.

Bat Banter

Computer algorithms helped Israeli researchers decode the language of Egyptian fruit bats and discover that bats exchange information about specific problems.

Free Wheeling

Easily movable mini-houses now range from the functional to the outlandish, including abodes mounted on tractors and shopping carts and ones attachable to rock faces.

Rolling Internet

A 40-foot-long Winnebago called the Digibus rolled through central California towns to train kids and adults in computer and job-searching skills.

Milkweed Mittens

Milkweed pods, which are five times lighter than synthetic insulation, are being tested by the Canadian Coast Guard as filler in prototype parkas, gloves and mittens.

Easy Mark

European supermarkets are cutting costs and saving energy by using high-tech lasers to mark prices on avocados, sweet potatoes and coconuts, with more to come.

Elder Force

The financially strapped National Park Service increasingly relies on volunteers to staff visitor centers and campsites, and a third of the workers are over age 54.

Accepted Misfits

Grocery stores are increasingly offering ugly-but-edible produce to customers at reduced prices instead of dumping them into a landfill.

Orca Finale

Under legal and activist pressure, SeaWorld is ending its theatrical killer whale shows and breeding program.

Tuna Turnaround

Levels of toxic mercury in Atlantic Bluefin tuna declined 19 percent between 2004 and 2012, a drop that scientists attribute to a shift from coal to natural gas and renewable energy.

Buzzing RoboBees

Harvard researchers have invented tiny robotic bees that may be able to eventually pollinate the crops that are under threat because of vanishing bee colonies.

Tea Time

Australian scientists are seeking citizens around the world to bury tea bags in wetlands to measure the rate as which the bags capture and store carbon.

Nature Rights

New Zealand and India have granted the legal status of personhood to vital rivers, forwarding an international movement that seeks to protect precious natural resources from corporate domination.

City Smarts

Cities throughout the country are exploring fresh ways to make cities both environmentally sustainable and pedestrian- and bike-friendly.

Bee Killers

As use of controversial neonicotinoid pesticides on plants grew from 1994 onward, extinction rates of bees grew by a parallel amount.

Last Call

Endangered species may lose their federal protection if some Republican senators from western states succeed in taking the teeth out of the Endangered Species Act passed in 1973.

Astonishing Agriculture

A greenhouse in the South Australia desert uses coconut husks, solar power and desalinated seawater to grow 17,000 tons of non-GMO food every year.

Species Die-Off

Species of rhinoceros, tortoise, treefrog and leopard are among those verified as having disappeared forever as of 2016.

Robot Janitors

Solar- and hydro-powered trash robots are sucking up plastic, Styrofoam and other debris from Baltimore’s harbor, and the waste is used to generate electricity.

Healthy Holdover

Michelle Obama’s White House kitchen garden that promotes healthy eating will continue for 17 years.

Rigged Research

French researchers have concluded that 40 percent of 579 GMO (genetically modified food) studies are tainted by conflicts of interest, such as a study author being employed by a company that profits from genetically engineered crops.

Floral Throughways

If you’re awed by the mass of blooms decorating highway meridians and embankments, you often have local garden clubs to thank, along with partnering state highway departments.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags